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Post Archive for February 2010

India, U.S. Policy »

Political Costs in New Delhi and Washington

India often finds itself making major demands of the United States. It asked the U.S. to rewrite global nonproliferation rules to accommodate India’s status as a de facto nuclear power (accomplished under the George W. Bush administration), to revise U.S. technology export controls so that Indian companies and India’s military can gain access to more advanced U.S. technology (a priority for the Obama administration), and to advocate permanent membership for India in the UN Security Council (a goal to which no U.S. administration has yet committed itself).

But America turns to India rarely; and when it does, in important areas from climate change to global trade to isolating Iran, India’s approach is often at odds with that of the United States. This limits the extent of the U.S.-India relationship. Indeed, many Indian politicians are sensitive about even the perception of aligning with the United States. While it doesn’t help to blindly accuse India of intransigence without understanding its policy environment, we would be equally mistaken to deny that the relationship will have limits until circumstances change.

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China, U.S. Policy »

[3 February 2010, No Comments]

I did a radio interview this morning on the sources of recent U.S.-China disagreement, particularly the arms sale to Taiwan and President Obama’s expected April 2010 meeting with the Dalai Lama.

Click here for the audio (Spanish/English).

China, Press, U.S. Policy »

Media: Colombia National Radio – “Coffee and News” Morning Show (Live).

Subjects: Sources of U.S.-China disagreement, particularly the arms sale to Taiwan and President Obama’s expected April 2010 meeting with the Dalai Lama.

Length: 9:13.

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China, U.S. Policy »

Despite How It Looks, Everyone Wins–Even China

As usual, the Chinese government is wildly overreacting to the most recent U.S. sales of arms to Taiwan, this time threatening sanctions against involved U.S. companies. (Even though such sanctions would hurt China more than anyone else.) Today’s China Daily editorial claimed “China’s response, no matter how vehement, is justified.” But both China’s government and the Western media are missing the ways that the U.S. security relationship with Taiwan benefits all of the parties involved, including China.

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