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[9 April 2011, Comments Off on Let’s Negotiate an Investment Treaty with China, Tags: , , , , , , ]

Apple's first retail store in China, located in Beijing. A bilateral investment treaty would give U.S.-based companies like Apple greater rights in China, while attracting more Chinese investment into the United States.

Date: 8 April 2011.

Publication: The Huffington Post.

Author: Daniel Michaeli.

In recent years, Beijing has asked repeatedly for a treaty that would give U.S. investors in China greater and more enforceable rights. It is high time for the Obama administration to respond seriously — by concluding its open-ended review of bilateral investment treaties and working one out with China. The U.S. and China should work aggressively over the next several weeks to prepare to announce a timeline for negotiations at the U.S.-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue in Washington next month.

American firms have nearly $50 billion invested in China, and a recent survey of companies investing in China indicates that most intend to increase their investments substantially this year. The performance of these investments is crucial to the U.S. economy: they enable American companies to access China’s huge domestic market and catalyze American exports — U.S. multinationals send half of their total exports from the United States to their own foreign affiliates. American corporations, when successful overseas, bring jobs and investment back to the United States. Recent data indicates that U.S.-based multinational corporations locate more than half of their employees in the United States, where they have 70 percent of their operations and spend 87 percent of their research and development budget.

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Frustration of Foreign Companies in China Might Be a Boon for India–But Only If India is Ready
[1 April 2010, Comments Off on China’s Tense Business Climate Could Benefit India, Tags: , , , , , , ]

Integrated auto manufacturing facility near Chennai, India*

From the Indian perspective, the recent downtown in China’s business friendliness to foreign companies is good news. Some companies are beginning to question whether they have too many eggs in the China basket.

Right next door to China is another vibrant economy, with relatively stronger domestic spending, a younger population, and–within just 15 years–what is expected to become the world’s largest population, larger than China’s.

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