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Posts tagged with: U.S. China Policy

China, U.S. Policy »

I’ve heard many people over the past few weeks question whether we should continue engaging with China as we have–or, even more starkly, whether we should engage with China at all.

The argument goes something like this: Engagement was supposed to produce a different kind of China than we’re seeing today, one that shares U.S. interests. Because the Chinese government is behaving increasingly aggressively against the “status quo” and has been moving backwards on political and economic reforms, engagement has failed and we need another policy.

I understand the frustration underlying this kind of argument; I, too, am deeply troubled by recent trends in China. But we should question the assumptions and reasoning above. Here are a few reasons why:
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China, U.S. Policy »

Despite How It Looks, Everyone Wins–Even China

As usual, the Chinese government is wildly overreacting to the most recent U.S. sales of arms to Taiwan, this time threatening sanctions against involved U.S. companies. (Even though such sanctions would hurt China more than anyone else.) Today’s China Daily editorial claimed “China’s response, no matter how vehement, is justified.” But both China’s government and the Western media are missing the ways that the U.S. security relationship with Taiwan benefits all of the parties involved, including China.

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China »

A New Round of Talks with the Dalai Lama, and U.S. Diplomacy Fails Again
[26 January 2010, 3 Comments, Tags: , , , ]

The Dalai Lama’s representatives are beginning a new round of talks with the Chinese government, after a 15-month hiatus. Though this has not been widely reported, the U.S. government is involved in facilitating this round of talks. But despite renewed attention to the Tibetan issue, there is little reason to believe this round of talks is any more likely than before to lead to a breakthrough. Another failure for U.S. diplomacy?

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India »

U.S.-China Tensions Could Leave Room for Indian Leadership

After Copenhagen, many are beginning to rethink their expectations for collaboration between the United States and China. The idea of a “Group of Two” (G2) was always far-fetched and, arguably, misguided. But now that popular perception of a G2 is changing as the world finds it harder to work with China, there could be new opportunities for Asia’s other rising great power: India.

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China, Press, U.S. Policy »

Media: Icelandic National Broadcasting Service – Radio 1 “Spegillinn.”

Subjects: President Obama’s trip to Shanghai and Beijing, and the U.S.-China relationship.

Length: 5:42.

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China, U.S. Policy »

Obama’s Trip to China

A good reality check today from Steve Dunaway on the true balance of leverage between China and the United States.

The popular narrative in the United States is that President Obama has little leverage in Beijing to push President Hu in areas like its currency peg, Iran and North Korea, or even human rights. But the real story is more complicated, as always.

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China, Press, U.S. Policy »

Media: Icelandic National Broadcasting Service – Evening News.

Subjects: President Obama’s trip to China, and the U.S.-China relationship.

Length: 1:45.

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